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landscape architecture, art, urban design

Hamilton is known as an industrial center and an arts city. It is also an Eco-city.

Tropos, meaning to turn, or to change, is built on the understanding that time and movement are essential parts of the design process and that change is a key part of the way we experience the world.

 

Tropos+ is the studio's research space. Our work explores human connection to the land through the arts. Landscape architects have long investigated links between people, health, and nature. As part of Tropos+  we explore different approaches to science-based questions about art, design and issues of landscape.

 

The studio's current research explores the role Monument Trees play in understanding regional natural systems. As cultural symbols, our work values old trees as repositories of memory and a foundation for sense of place.

We work from this understanding to look at developing underutilized landscapes into naturalized urban spaces, and expand how these environments can support people and wider ecosystems.

 

The studio's research incorporates performance-based methodology, material studies, and analytical site research that was developed by Lesia Mokrycke in the early stages of her art practice. These methods use a variety of 'experiments' designed to test ideas and allow certain programs to play out in physical space.

Monument Trees

Online exhibition

& resource

FUNCTION

FORM

SPIRIT

Building Conservation Networks

Building Conservation Networks

Urban Forest Research

Climate Systems

Climate Systems

Atmospheric Research

Form and Function

Form and Function

Material Research

Marginalia

Marginalia

Writing Research

Methods for Writing

Methods for Writing

Performance Research

Public Art Internment Memorial

Public Art Internment Memorial

Social Engagement

Relational Architecture: the body in space

Relational Architecture: the body in space

Spatial Research

Banff Memorial

Banff Memorial

Site Research

Urban Forest Lab

Urban Forest Lab

Trees and Water

 

Our research shows a strong correlation between old trees and urban surface level and underground streams. Ancient, Monumental Trees are especially important in regulating the circulation of water within the earth's atmosphere. 

For millions of years, plants have shaped our climate conditions and continue to be a part of the urban water story. Trees are nature's engineering system. Our current work looks at how urban trees participate in hydrology and play an important role in the story of water.

Hamilton is known as an industrial center and an arts city. It is also an Eco-city.

Building Conservation Networks is a research-based installation project created by Lesia Mokrycke to raise awareness about the degradation of the urban forest, to illuminate correlation between water and terrestrial ecosystems, and to connect atmospheric forces with human experience. The project underscores the key message that protecting ancient trees in urban areas and restoring habitat can significantly decrease carbon emissions and safeguard the planet.   

 

Click on the menu to learn about each tree species, share a story, and view the tree index. Our research is dovetailing with the local municipality to foster new and innovative approaches to conserve and enhance the urban forest. Made possible through the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

2021- Now

Environmental Artwork

Building Conservation Networks

Urban Forest Lab

Urban Forest Lab

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